Caught by the River Teifi, 10-17 August

A week of music, workshops, adventures, talks, campfires, good food, good people and good times

fforest is teaming up with their friends Caught by the River to bring you a whole week of music, workshops and adventure at fforest farm and River's Edge in Cardigan.

Revellers can choose to come and relax for the whole week or just come for the weekend festival by the river. Basically, it's a Welsh adventure in two parts:

fforest midweek: 300 people in 200 acres of bliss at fforest farm, 10-14 August
A truly unique gathering, offering the chance to explore one of the most idyllic, unspoilt outdoor locations in Britain. Four days of painting, whittling, baking, field recording, swimming, canoeing and woodsmoke. There will also be live music, dancing in the barn and, of course, sleep.

River's edge weekend: 500 people on the riverside in Cardigan, 15-17 August
A proper mini-festival with a brilliant line-up of bands and DJs from Wales and beyond curated by Caught By The River, talks and and readings hosted by the Wales Arts Review and local food and beer from the good people of fforest and friends.

Guests include: Jeb Loy Nichols, Nick Hand, Rob St John, Matt Sewell, Cynan Jones, Castle, Colorama and many, many more.

To find out more and to book tickets visit teififestival.co.uk

A guide to classic hats: the fedora

Allon Zloof, founder of London hat maker Tom Smarte, is your guide to choosing the perfect hat to suit your face shape and complement any ensemble. This time it's Indiana Jones' signature headpiece – the fedora

Fur and merino felt Fedora, £250 Photo: Hanson Leatherby

Fur and merino felt Fedora, £250 Photo: Hanson Leatherby

The word 'fedora' comes from the title of an 1882 play by Victorien Sardou, whose work popularised this style of hat when it was worn by the cross-dressing lead actress Sarah Bernhardt.The hat evolved from the very formal homburg style and became popular in the 1920s. A fedora is characterised by having a wide brim, 5-6cm, snapped down at the front and a pinched crown. It is usually made from felt as a winter hat, or from Panama straw as a summer option.

Who it suits

The fedora is very easy to wear and suits most faces, except for those with a short face shape.You should think of a hat as a way to provide symmetry and balance to your face – if the length between your eyebrows and chin is on the short side, a fedora would look too top heavy.

How to wear it

Always place a fedora from the front of your head to the back and adjust with a very slight tilt to the side. Pair a felt fedora with a trench coat, tailored suit or leather jacket (think Indiana Jones) or a Panama fedora with slim fit chinos or tailored shorts and a linen shirt.

This is a sponsored blog post, created in collaboration with Tom Smarte. For more information on partnerships and joining our directory, please email advertise@ernestjournal.co.uk.

Mateus Rosé

What do Saddam Hussein, Jimi Hendrix and The Queen have in common? It's sweet, it's fizzy and it's pink

Illustration: Louise Wyatt

Illustration: Louise Wyatt

Mateus Rosé, with its crazy pink colour, presented in the flask-shaped bottle we know so well, was quaffed by Jimi Hendrix and fuelled Neil Young’s On the Beach. It was found hoarded in Saddam Hussein’s palace after his fall in 2003, and is apparently one of Fidel Castro’s favourite wines. The Queen reputedly drinks it when she dines alone.

Fernando Van Zeller Guedes first produced this sweet, fizzy rosé in the 1940s from Portuguese red grape varieties that were vinificated into white wine. Guedes sent two bottles to Portuguese ambassadors across the world, inviting them to try the wine and give a bottle to a friend.

This distribution strategy really worked, and by the 1970s it was globally popular. Its sweetness and low price appealed to teens, and its exoticness was seen as sophisticated by middle-class families. And it might just be the only thing rock stars, communists, fascists, teenagers and The Queen can agree on.

Words by contributing editor Guy Lochhead

Wunderkammer of today

We invite you to explore Eastern Biological's cabinet of botanical, geological and entomological stationery, gifts and oddities to satisfy the curious 

Body Anatomy Model This 31-piece model can be opened up to reveal the workings of the human body. £14.50

Body Anatomy Model
This 31-piece model can be opened up to reveal the workings of the human body. £14.50

Woodcut Notecard Set 12 notecards based on the book Woodcut by Bryan Nash Gill, revealing the inner beauty of trees. £11

Woodcut Notecard Set
12 notecards based on the book Woodcut by Bryan Nash Gill, revealing the inner beauty of trees. £11

A Voyage of Discovery, by Alice Pattullo 4-colour screen print of Charles Darwin and his groundbreaking discoveries on the Galápagos islands in 1835. £85

A Voyage of Discovery, by Alice Pattullo
4-colour screen print of Charles Darwin and his groundbreaking discoveries on the Galápagos islands in 1835. £85

Opulent Oceans This gift set includes accounts from early naturalists and comes with 40 art prints of sea creatures. £38

Opulent Oceans
This gift set includes accounts from early naturalists and comes with 40 art prints of sea creatures. £38

Galapagos Tortoise Pop this hand-painted chap on your desk and simply revel in the joy of his being. Made from high density plastic. £5.95

Galapagos Tortoise
Pop this hand-painted chap on your desk and simply revel in the joy of his being. Made from high density plastic. £5.95

Measuring Conical A great alternative to a measuring jug for use in the kitchen. Available in two sizes. From £7

Measuring Conical
A great alternative to a measuring jug for use in the kitchen. Available in two sizes. From £7

Jungle Plates Inject some tropical flavour into your home with these melamine plates covered in jungle print. £6

Jungle Plates
Inject some tropical flavour into your home with these melamine plates covered in jungle print. £6

Greenhouse Pot This concrete base and glass cover provides a perfect environment for indoor plants. Please note: plant not included. £55

Greenhouse Pot
This concrete base and glass cover provides a perfect environment for indoor plants. Please note: plant not included. £55

Late Jurassic, by Sam Brewster We’re enchanted by this limited edition print illustration of a Pangaean landscape teeming with Jurassic life. £85

Late Jurassic, by Sam Brewster
We’re enchanted by this limited edition print illustration of a Pangaean landscape teeming with Jurassic life. £85

Large Fossil Fish Treasure your very own nugget of prehistory with this fossil of a Knightia, disovered in the Green River Formation, Wyoming. £20

Large Fossil Fish
Treasure your very own nugget of prehistory with this fossil of a Knightia, disovered in the Green River Formation, Wyoming. £20

Discover more about Eastern Biological in our online directory.

This is a sponsored blog post, created in collaboration with Eastern Biological. For more information on partnerships and joining our directory please email advertise@ernestjournal.co.uk.

The Helm Wind

It has swept horses to their deaths, flattened barns and spooked walkers with its eerie banshee wail – Simon Ingram tells the tale of a Cumbrian wind so infamous, it even has its own name

The Helm Cloud, image by Anita Evans

The Helm Cloud, image by Anita Evans

Wind is, you’d think, a rather geographically encompassing thing. So to have a particularly ferocious one inhabiting a specific locality – and noticeable enough to have its own name – is quite a thing. Britain has only one.

A few more names, to get acquainted; firstly, the place it is local to. Cross Fell, a scraped summit on the less cuddly side of Cumbria, is named either because of its aggressive conditions – as in, this is a 'cross' fell – or because a venerable saint erected a cross atop to banish demons from what was then known as Fiend’s Fell. Neither likelihood intimates a particularly cheerful venue. And the wind itself: the Helm. It’s so called because its visual hallmark – in addition to a sonic one like the wail of an express train – is a cloud that sits atop Cross Fell like a helmet, sometimes with another ‘bar’ that forms before it like a scythe.

This wind has flattened barns, turned sprouts blown from stalks into bullets and blustered sheep around yards like cotton wool. It’s killed a horse and allegedly a flattened a Norman battalion. John Ruskin described it dearly as one of ‘the plague winds of the world,’ and to this day, the Helm Wind remains erratic but present. Look our for the Helm cloud on Cross Fell – and if you’re wise or superstitious, flee. 

Learn more in Simon Ingram’s new book Between the Sunset and the Sea, published by William Collins, £18.99

Simon Ingram is an author and journalist preoccupied with the high places of Britain. He is the editor of Trail, the UK's best-selling hillwalking magazine