Millican x Ernest competition

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Millican to give you the chance to win one of three Tinsley the Tote Packs worth £90 each

Get your hands on a Tinsley Tote, like our editor Jo! Photo by Jim Marsden

Get your hands on a Tinsley Tote, like our editor Jo! Photo by Jim Marsden

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Tinsley the Tote Pack (H 36cm x W 27cm x D 11cm) is an everyday tote that’s up for adventure. Ideal as a lightweight tote bag for around town, the multi-functional handles quickly convert to make a backpack with adjustable shoulder straps for longer trips. Designed for easy storage, the dual-purpose tote, made with durable Bionic® Canvas, features a weatherproof roll-top opening and comes with a quick-reach outer pocket for valuables and internal sections for keeping on top of life.

- - - Click here to enter - - -

The competition closes midnight 30 April 2019. Millican will announce the winner on their Facebook and Instagram pages on 1st May 2019. Good Luck!.

Shooting Snowdonia

We caught up with photographer Colin Nicholls to ask how he found shooting the wild uplands and abandoned slate quarries of northwest Wales

Colin Nicholls doing what he does best.

Colin Nicholls doing what he does best.

How did you find shooting the Snowdonian landscape? And how did this compare with shooting East Anglia for issue 7?

I am a big fan of Snowdonia, so to get to head there on a press trip was a real treat. I found it very different to East Anglia, much more walking up mountains and hills, and a much rougher landscape altogether. As expected for Snowdonia, we encountered some wet weather, so my weather-sealed cameras came in very useful. I enjoyed visiting both places but seeing and climbing mountains is something that always excites me.

What were the highlights of the trip for you?

Definitely going back to the Dinorwic slate quarry. I first visited there a few years back and loved seeing the abandoned slate workings that overlook Snowdon itself. To explore the remains of a Goliath of an industry – it really is like stepping back in time. We also had incredible weather up there with the light painting the landscape, and we were met along the way by some wild goats, one of which features on the cover!

Any low points?

I’m pretty easy going so it takes a lot to dampen my spirits, however the first night we camped the wind was howling and I got about two hours sleep. Safe to say the next day was a struggle but it was all good fun.

Where would you most like to photograph next and why?

I think for the first couple of months of the year I’ll explore my local area of Herefordshire. There’s so much around here that’s overlooked in favour of the ‘bigger’ and more well-known places to visit, and with photography being so much about light it’s nice to know that if it’s going to be a good day I can head out somewhere close for a quick and successful trip.

You're a frequent visitor to Iceland, aren't you? What draws you back again and again?

That I am! 2018 saw my fourth trip to Iceland, where I drove solo around the country, camping along the way. It was incredible! At the time Iceland was having the worst summer for 100 years, but I was lucky and the weather turned and I had some crisp, clear days and got the opportunity to take photos that make me very happy. I shot a fair bit of video, too. Overall the trip was one of the most content times of my life. I keep getting drawn back to the country’s endless beauty, epic landscapes and sparse population – it’s a place I’ll continue to visit for the rest of my life.

Who are your landscape photography heroes?

That’s a very hard question. I tend to take inspiration from a wide range of photographic disciplines. Interestingly I find war photography to be one of the most inspiring – people tasked with documenting the most hostile places in the world, while having to bear in mind the technical aspect of photography and tell a story. I try to surround myself with photography books and follow decent photographers on Instagram. Seeing what other people are up to, create stunning images, is a real drive for pushing my own abilities.

Colin, you’re known as the ‘king of snacks’ on long press trips. What’s your ultimate photography fuel?

Ha, awesome question. Cold cans of cola are number one on a hot day hiking up mountains. And cereal bars. I can survive on those bad boys for days.

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Colin shoots on a Fuji X-H1. Follow his work on Instagram or on his blog colinnichollsphotography.com

His stunning images feature in our 36-page special on Snowdonia in issue 8 of Ernest Journal. Pick up a copy today.

Issue 8 (special edition)
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Sea Spaghetti

Caro and Tim of the Cornish Seaweed Company dive into some of the cleanest waters in the world to hand-harvest their unusual bounty – dulse, nori, kelp and sea spaghetti

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Considering seaweed’s abundance and its supreme nutritional value, it’s a wonder we’re not seeing more of this flavoursome superfood on our plates. Try it for yourself – give this crab ‘tagliatelli’ a whirl. If you can’t get hold of crabmeat, prawns work just as well.

Ingredients

50g fresh sea spaghetti or 15g dried sea spaghetti
1 x carrot
1 x courgette
1 x leek
1/2 fresh chill, finely chopped, or 1/2 tsp chilli paste
2 x tomatoes
1 x lemon
1 x garlic clove, peeled and crushed
1 tbsp olive oil
600g crabmeat
Ground black pepper

Method

  1. If using dried sea spaghetti, re-hydrate for 10 minutes in cold water, then drain. If using fresh, cut into ribbons about 10cm long.

  2. Thinly slice the carrot, courgette and leek into ribbons. Dice the tomatoes.

  3. Slice the lemon in half and keep one half for squeezing. Cut away the skin and pith then slice the flesh into segments.

  4. Heat the oil in a frying pan over a medium heat, then add the garlic, chilli, tomato and crab meat and cook together into a paste for 5 minutes.

  5. Add the vegetable ribbons and the seaweed with 250ml water and the juice from the reserved lemon half. Stir-fry for 5 minutes, then add pepper to taste. Garnish with the pieces of lemon.

Sustainability is at the heart of the Cornish Seaweed Company. Caro and Tim follow a strict code of conduct that ensures no wildlife is disturbed, and harvested areas are left to regenerate.

Newspapers from the edge of the world

Born out of trouble and strife in the world’s most inhospitable places, handmade newspapers were essential for passing the time and boosting morale and comradeship in the bleakest of circumstances

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The Wipers Times (1916)

Beneath the bludgeoned Belgian city of Ypres, accompanied by nothing more than a printing press, a dusty gramophone and a piano (played full blast to mask the sound of German shells), two British soldiers – Captain Fred Roberts and Lieutenant Jack Pearson – published the first 12-page edition of what became the ‘unofficial’ newspaper of the Western Front. The Wipers Times (a phonetic pronunciation of Ypres by British soldiers) contained a mix of tales from the trenches and bawdy British satire lampooning senior allied officials. Needless to say, it was a welcome reprieve from the horrifying realities of the First World War. Twenty two editions were published before the war came to a close.

The Bullfrog Miner (1905)

Finding its feet at the end of the Gold Rush, The Bullfrog Miner was one of many short-lived periodicals providing news for mining communities. According to folklore, the initial rush to the Bullfrog district caused a heated battle between two editors, CW Nicklin and Frank P Mannix, who each claimed rights to the eponymous and irrefutably catchy namesake. After heated exchanges, the dispute was eventually settled when Nicklin renamed his paper The Beatty Bullfrog Miner (far catchier).

The Vernon Guard (1890)

Legend has it that the wildest of the Wild West were, in fact, the editors of the frontier newspapers that circulated throughout the Cattle Kingdom. Never afraid to put their opinion to paper, they were considered by many as unofficial community orators, chronicling the lives of their readership. So outspoken was the editor of the Vernon Guard, he once met with the threat of suffering a “sufficient number of holes” by the local sheriff. Sources suggest the editor did meet an untimely end; the pen is not, it would seem, mightier than a gun.

The Snowbound (1890)

The Snowbound is the stuff of journalistic legend. The story goes that in 1890, during a perilous Nevada winter, 600 passengers were stranded in Reno on the Southern Pacific Railroad. George T McCully took it upon himself to relieve the distress of his freezing companions by printing a paper. The Snowbound, “issued every weekday afternoon by S P Prisoner in Car No. 36”, was a four-page daily with the outside pages written in blue ink and the inside written in pencil. Sources suggest the publication wasn’t entirely successful, possibly because the editor charged the princely sum of 25¢ per issue.

The Antarctic Sun (1997)

Serving scientists, explorers and polar gardeners alike, The Antarctic Sun reports on all manner of news from this remote part of the world, funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the US Antarctic Programme. Expect to find stories on procedure for budding physicists on the search for neutrinos, comic strips, musings on the ‘utilitarian’ beauty of research station architecture and the cold hard facts of life in a sub-zero climate. The current editor, Mike Lucibella, publishes weekly during the austral summer, with the occasional mid-winter special.

Words by Matthew Iredale

These stories feature in issue 8 of Ernest Journal, alongside a fascinating article about the history of polar newspapers, written by Professor Elizabeth Leane. Pick up a copy of issue 8 today.

Issue 8 (special edition)
10.00
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Forging ahead

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