Bonafide Ventilating Hat

A stroke of Victorian design genius to keep your head perspiration and oil free

 Design for a Bonafide Ventilating Hat , 1849,  Inventions That Didn't Change The World , by Julie Halls, published by  Thames & Hudson

Design for a Bonafide Ventilating Hat , 1849, Inventions That Didn't Change The World, by Julie Halls, published by Thames & Hudson

Throughout the 19th century no respectable person would go outside without wearing a hat, and for most of the Victorian period top hats were worn by middle-class men. They became a symbol of urban respectability. Early Victorian top hats were heavy, and the 'Bonafide Ventilating Hat' was one of several designs registered which attempted to tackle the problem of a build-up of steam, perspiration and hair oil that resulted. 

This is an extract from Inventions That Didn't Change The World, by Julie Halls, published by Thames & Hudson.

It is a book that tells the story of 19th-century enterprise, enthusiasm and, above all, optimism.