Remapping the frozen continent

In issue 7 of Ernest Journal, writer and humanitarian Carol Devine shared the story of her mission to compile a list of female place names in Antarctica – some old, some new, some lost to a rapidly changing climate – and chart them on a new map of the frozen continent. To accompany her words, we commissioned map-maker and illustrator Aidan Meighan to create Carol's vision. It's fair to say we were stunned by the result...

 'Mapping Antarctic Women', illustrated by Aidan Meighan, © Carol Devine. 

'Mapping Antarctic Women', illustrated by Aidan Meighan, © Carol Devine. 

Aidan, when we first approached you to illustrate Carol Devine's map of Antarctic women, what was your initial reaction? 

I eagerly await all of my Ernest briefs and this one from Carol was particularly exciting! I loved having the opportunity to involve myself in all her incredible research. Maps are often snapshots of history; changing landscapes, politics and territories – this map not only shows history but amends it. It was a joy to map the success of these inspirational women explorers, scientists and innovators. 

What are your feelings towards this remote, frozen continent at the bottom of the world? 

It sounds like something out of science fiction – a continent made of 99% ice, with temperatures reaching −89.2 °C! I've always been a keen environmentalist and I think it's of paramount importance that we look after our frozen friend down south. Global warming and the world's biggest lump of ice... what could possibly go wrong? I've always been interested in the people brave enough to explore this hostile part of the world. But it wasn't until creating this map that I realised so many of them were women. We've been seeing Antarctica through male-tinted glasses for many years – so many maps of the past have neglected to mention the inspirational women explorers, scientists and innovators who journeyed there.

Tell us about your design process when it comes to illustrating a map.

With all maps I start by thinking of the most effective way to display the key content. From there I think about its message and how it should look and feel. Then I begin to harmonise the content with the design – it begins to get really satisfying, polishing it up until it becomes something special. In this case I thought it was important for Carol's research to do the talking. I wanted to draw influence from classic maps of the continent, while shifting the perspective to highlight those underrepresented in the past. 

You also illustrated a few other maps and images for issue 7 – tell us a bit about them. 

I LOVED illustrating for issue 7 – I could really get my teeth into it. One of my favourites was the little map of Doggerland for the East Anglia special - it's such a fascinating place and I was pleased with its aesthetic. It's really nice to get into multiple illustrations on a theme, such as East Anglia, partly because you can get into a groove from a design perspective, but also I love learning about new places. My head is full of hundreds of bizarre facts and stories, including the Orford Merman!

What's your favourite map (not one of yours!) and why?

Hmm, that is tough! There are so many to choose from and in so many styles.  Maps I love range from Ptolemy's world map, to modern maps such as Grayson Perry's A Map of Days and the extremely practical and classic design of the OS maps. Right this very minute though I'd probably go for Walter Goodacre's Map of the Moon (below), a hand drawn map of the moon's surface, drawn in 25 segments, with the total diameter measuring 77" (1910).

Walter Goodacre Moon Map 1910.png

Where would you most like to travel?

Iceland, Japan or New Zealand. The landscapes in Iceland look otherworldly – I'd love to go there and do some drawings of the mountains, lava fields and geysers.

You're currently redesigning your website - how's that going? Any other exciting developments/projects you'd like to tell us about?

Actually we are a tad behind schedule trying to get it just right, but it will launch in May sometime, which is very exciting. As well as editorial maps for the likes of Ernest, I also draw customised maps of people's homes and favourite places. The new website seeks to marry the two a little bit and basically become a map extravaganza. The page I'm most excited about introducing is 'Maps by Aidan', which will showcase the eclectic range of maps I've drawn for Ernest and other publications, such as the map of Brutalist buildings in London, bothies in Scotland and the new maps in issue 7.

Tell us a bit about your work space. What do you like to have around you? Do you listen to music or a particular station?

I've just moved house from Bristol (an incredible place to have spent the last 12 years and started my illustration career) to the green and tranquil Quantock hills in Somerset. Right now from my studio window I see a shed, a few ancient oak trees and about 20 cows that come up to our garden fence to say hello every morning. I like to be surrounded by greenery. In Bristol, without a garden, the number of houseplants in our collection got a bit out of control. My desk is usually pretty tidy, but here's an inventory of what's on it today!

A History of the World in Twelve Maps by Jerry Brotton
A hakisak
Two yoyos (a pro yo and an X brain)
A tin of earl grey tea
Three pots of Quink ink and 1 Windsor and Newton (3 black, 1 blue)
A spirit level
A hammer
A tile with a crude painting of a man riding a horse
Some big old headphones
Two terrariums and two potted succulents
Two tea-dregged 'Habitat Connor' orange mugs
...and of course my computer

I flit between podcasts (RadioLab, Ear Hustle, etc) and get my music fix on BBC 6 Music.

  Photo by Poppy French, Studio Grabdown

Photo by Poppy French, Studio Grabdown

You can see more of Aidan's work, in issue 7 of Ernest Journal, on sale now. 'Mapping Antarctic Women' is an ongoing project and Carol is keen to add to her map. Join the conversation on Twitter and Instagram using the hashtags #ernestjournal and #MappingAntarcticWomen

Follow Aidan on Instagram @whereabouts_maps, on Twitter @whereaboutsmaps and at whereaboutsmaps.com

 

 

Shooting the eerie East

For issue seven of Ernest Journal, photographer Colin Nicholls accompanied editor Jo Tinsley on her journey along the East Anglian coast, exploring ghost towns, eroding sea cliffs and the abandoned laboratories and weapons testing facilities of Orford Ness. Colin tells us about his experience photographing these extraordinary locations

  Sizewell Nuclear Power Station. All images by Colin Nicholls

Sizewell Nuclear Power Station. All images by Colin Nicholls

Colin, what did you shoot with?

I took my Fuji XT2 and my 16mm, 23mm, and 56mm lenses. This is pretty much the standard kit for most of my work – the really small size of the camera, and the overall quality of the pictures all add up to a very nice working system. The XT2 is a mirrorless camera and much smaller and lighter than a standard DLSR setup. It's all weather sealed, which proved very useful while at Orford Ness.

How did you find shooting East Anglian landscapes, in comparison with other landscapes you've photographed? Were there any challenges?

The biggest challenge was shooting landscapes that were very minimal. Usually I look for a leading line or some way of composing the image to take the viewer's eye into it, but when there is very little you have to think a bit differently. As such, I embraced the minimal landscapes and shot in a way to show the viewer the sparse landscape in all its glory.

What surprised you most about the places you visited on your trip?

Pretty much everything we did was a massive surprise and really great fun. I’d never been to the east coast of England before, so it was nice to get the chance. I think the biggest surprise was seeing how the sea takes back the land so indiscriminately.

What was your favourite location and why?

Definitely Orford Ness. Getting to go inside the weapons testing facilities and see areas that few visitors get to see was incredible. I really enjoy those kind of raw concrete structures.

Anything you didn't enjoy quite so much?

Night walking. You just can’t see anything at all; you just follow the person in front of you. It was actually quite a fun experience, especially getting to see hundreds of glow worms, but the rain that accompanied us definitely was not. When I got back to my tent everything was wet, so I had to sleep in my car instead.

Where will you be going next with your camera?

I'm currently planning a two-week tour of Iceland, which will be my fourth trip to this wonderful place. This time it’s a solo journey and I’m hoping to get a lot done in the two weeks, particularly things that aren’t the standard tourist destinations. I’ll be documenting the whole thing so I’m hoping to put together a short film by the time I’m done.

What's on your bedside table?

Only a red anglepoise lamp, which my father bought when he was 21 and gave to me when I was a teenager. I like things quite minimal.

Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.02.54 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.03.50 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.06.56 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.41.46 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.04.37 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.35.56 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.50.21 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.05.16 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.05.53 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.46.58 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-23 at 10.36.24 AM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-23 at 10.37.30 AM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-23 at 10.38.13 AM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-23 at 10.40.34 AM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.53.57 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.06.11 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.44.22 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.56.22 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 1.46.30 PM.png
Colin Nicholls.jpg

Colin is a photographer specialising in weddings and editorial work, with a passion for landscape and street photography. 

colinnichollsphotography.com

 

 

 

 

 

You can see more of Colin's images and read our guide to East Anglia in issue seven of Ernest Journal, on sale now.

Issue 7
10.00
Quantity:
Add To Cart

Winter adventures

Make the most of starry skies and frosty mornings this winter and get out into the wild. Wynnchester is your guide to three essential elements of adventure kit: your bed, your shelter and your pack 

 Patrol Pack, £150

Patrol Pack, £150

Wynnchester was born out of a passion for beautiful design, a respect for simplicity and a love of nature. Today, they design heritage-inspired outdoors equipment for modern-day adventurers. Their customers include former and serving military, professional cowboys, scout masters and bushcraft instructors. Let's take a look at their expedition inventory:

Adventurer Bedroll

1-BEDROLL.jpg

The bedroll is a simple solo shelter that sets up in seconds. Fully enclosable, it requires no ground sheet, no guy ropes and no pegs. Built to last, the bedroll is manufactured in the UK using only the finest, military-spec materials. The all-canvas construction is robust and durable, pre-treated for water, rot and fire resistance. Wynnchester’s bedrolls are used by hundreds of professionals and recreational campers the world over. £525

Adventure Tarp

2-TARP.jpg

Made from the same material as the bedroll, this tough canvas tarp won’t catch fire or be ruined by flying embers from your campfire or cooking stove. Measuring 3m x 1.85m, it is the perfect size for a one-man shelter. With a total of 10 reinforced attachment points, the setups are limited only by your imagination. £225

Patrol Pack

bigpatrol.jpg

After many years restoring vintage Norwegian Army patrol packs in their workshops, the design was a natural choice for Wynnchester’s line of new-made bags. Their modern version, the 18L PATROL, remains true to the original and is constructed from military-spec canvas and 100% cowhide top grade leather.  Each bag in the limited edition run is individually numbered and available in a choice of a fully waterproof, modern dry finish or a traditional hand-waxed finish using Wynnchester’s own all-natural wax formula. £150

Get 10% off these items using code ERNEST10 online at wynnchester.com

Gift guide: gently rugged carry goods

We are proud to introduce one of our sponsors Rural Kind: makers of simple, functional and gently rugged waxed canvas and leather carry goods for everyday adventuring, handcrafted in the hills of Wales

Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 1.43.11 PM.png

Key Carry
A sturdy and dependable strap for carrying your keys, with a brass stud fastening for attaching to a belt or bag. Handmade with oak bark tanned leather and solid brass hardware. £28

Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 1.43.40 PM.png

Roll-top Rucksack
Rugged enough for the hills, handsome enough for the city. This refined roll-top design is made with heavyweight waxed canvas and Devon leather. £250


Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 1.44.08 PM.png

Glasses Case
Be kind to your eyewear with this strong, refined and protective glasses case. Made by hand in our rural workshop from rich and characterful oak bark tanned leather. £89

Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 1.44.44 PM.png

Utility Bag
For everyday adventures, carrying tools, loading with books or filling with fresh groceries. Strong, durable and handcrafted from waxed canvas and oak bark tanned leather. £190


Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 1.45.10 PM.png

Card Wallet
A simple and functional two pocket wallet for carrying a few cards and some notes. Crafted from oak bark tanned leather and hand-stitched with a waxed linen thread. £36

Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 1.45.35 PM.png

Musette
For city strolls, gentle rides and everyday rambles. This waxed canvas and leather cross-body bag is our gently rugged take on the classic cyclist’s musette. £129

To find out more about Rural Kind, visit our Directory

A glossary of seafaring terms

From "knucker" to "knockarse", historian Chris Hare is your guide to fisherman's words past and present

 Illustration: Joe McLaren

Illustration: Joe McLaren

bexhill bunny (noun)

A term used on-board instead of saying ‘rabbits’, which was considered unlucky. Prolonged periods of bad weather meant that fishermen were forced to stay on shore and hunt for rabbits. 

gipper (noun)

Slime that oozes out of newly caught fish. 

hoggie (noun)

A Sussex fishing boat, particularly associated with Brighton. 

knockarse (noun)

A boat with a flat stern, like a hoggie. 

knucker (noun)

A legendary dragon that lived in the spring-fed pools found on the coastal plain of Sussex, known as knucker holes. 

mace (noun)

A dialect word for credit, e.g. “How did you afford your new nets?”, “Oh, I bought them on the mace.” 

shay (noun)

A bright misty haze or halo seen at night, often associated with supernatural apparitions. 

shraves (noun)

The dips in the chalk cliffs as seen from the sea, the truncated valleys of the the South Downs, e.g.The Seven Sisters. 

silver darlings (noun)

Fishermen’s slang for herring. A good catch of herring was worth a great deal to fishermen, equal in value to nets of silver. 

whale (noun)

A name for a fisherman’s apron. 

Chris Hare's book The Secret Shore and CD South Coast Songs and Shanties is available to buy at secretshore.org.uk.

This glossary originally featured in issue six of Ernest Journal, on sale now.

Issue 6
10.00
Quantity:
Add To Cart